Wording and Etiquette Guide for writing Wedding Invitation Message - Miami Wedding and Event Planner

Wording and Etiquette Guide for writing Wedding Invitation Message

Wording and Etiquette Guide for writing Wedding Invitation Message

Wedding invitations are much important than any further invitation you’ll ever send out. However, the focal intention is the same as others. It’s to ensure that guests clearly understand the who, what, when, and where of the event. A wedding invitation message is not the same as any other kind of invitation, it is more than just a simple invitation; it proposes a visual statement earlier than the guest even interpret the words. Invitation expresses the tradition and nature of your wedding through the form of the paper, letter font, and style; the added formal your wedding, the extra formal the wedding invitations.

How to word your wedding invitations?  

How to word wedding invitations is habitually one of the most worrying parts of planning a wedding ceremony. It doesn’t have to be a difficult task. Your invites are expressing the essential info to your friends and loved ones, so must keep this in mind.

The invitation has to include the names of the hosts (usually the bride’s parents)at the top of the invite and mention the name of the wedding couple, ceremony date, day of the week, time, and location of the venue. The word “and” among two names normally points out two people are already married, while the names of unmarried persons, such as you and your groom, are stacked.

Your invitation wording should match up with the ritual and style of your ceremony. From casual to formal, the wording should replicate the style and tone you’d like to set. Every wedding invitation must comprise these elements: host{s}, the couple getting married, date, time, and location. Be motivated! Select wording that reflects your situation, style, and spirit of your wedding ceremony.

Discuss with your officiate for style particulars but conventionally, if a couple marries in a place of worship, the request line phrasing reads “request the honor”. Words, dates, and numbers are normally spelled out, and the just abbreviations are Mr. and Mrs. Punctuation is normally found only in the time, date, or location. If the bride’s parents are hosting and the daughter shares their last name, it can be mislaid from the invitation. You can search for Wedding invitation samples to choose the best from or you can have your own and unique.

What to Include on Your Wedding Invitation?

The following elements are a must for all type of wedding invitations ideas:

  • Hosts names
  • The request to attend the wedding
  • Couple names
  • Date and time
  • Location of Venue
  • Reception information
  • Dress code
  • RSVP card (optional)

Wedding Invitation Wording Line by Line:

  • The Host:

Usually, parents of the bride are the hosts of the wedding ceremony and are named at the top of the Wedding invitation message, even for formal affairs. On the other hand, writing the names of both sets of parents as hosts is a polite option no matter who foots the bill. Moreover, increasingly couples nowadays are hosting weddings on their own, or do so mutually with their parents.

If it’s a mutual affair hosted and compensated for by the couple and both sets of parents, you can moreover use “Together with their parents, bride and groom request the gratification of your company.” If you want to incorporate the name of a parent who has passed away, you’ll require rearranging things a bit, as somebody who has passed can’t serve as a host. An alternating way, then, to incorporate a late parent just means slightly rearranging the wording. Try this, for example:

Bride name, daughter of Mr. Abc and the late XYZ.

Host Line Etiquette:

  • Capitalize accurate names and titles.
  • Don’t utilize punctuation, apart from after courtesy titles.
  • The Request to Attend:

There are lots of ways to request for the contentment of your guests’ company. The British spelling of “honour” customarily denotes that the ceremony will be held in a church or a different place of worship. Here are few options:

  • “Honor of your presence”
  • “The pleasure of your company”
  • “At the wedding of their children”
  • “Would love for you to join them”
  • “Invite you to have fun with them”
  • The Names of Couple:

If their names haven’t been integrated into the host line, they must still take center stage some lines down. No one would overlook to include this in a wedding invitation, certainly, but you may be wondering whose name must go first on a wedding invitation? Usually, the name of the bride constantly precedes the groom’s name. Formal invitations written by the bride’s parents proposed to bride by her first and middle names, and the groom by his complete name and title; if the wedding couple is hosting by themselves, their titles are elective.

Name Etiquette:

  • Capitalize names and titles.
  • Evade abbreviations; in general, spell everything out except courtesy titles.
  • Never interpret courtesy titles, except for “Doctor” in the case of medical doctors.
  • Think about using both partners’ full legal names. If you choose to go by a nickname, utilize it on the save the date or other, less reserved pieces of the invitation set.
  • Write the bride’s and/or groom’s middle names if they become much long to be adjusted on one line.
  • The Date and Time:

For formal wedding invitation wording, the whole lot is written out in full (no numerals). The year is not obligatory (the supposition being your wedding is on the adjoining such date). Time of day is spelled out via “o’clock” or “half after five o’clock.” The use of a.m. or p.m. is elective. For casual weddings, numerals are okay.

  • The Location:

The detailed street address of a venue is not generally required except omitting it would confuse or your wedding is taking place at the host’s home. The city and state should be written out in detail in any case.

Reception Information:

Very formal invitations comprise this information on a detached card. Or else, it can be written on the wedding invitation itself if there is space; if the ceremony and reception are going to be held in a similar location, you can write “and afterward at the reception” or “reception immediately following.” When the reception is somewhere else, the location goes on a diverse line.

Information Etiquette:

  • Clarify the date and year for formal invitations so that guests do not reorder numbers.
  • Explain the time for formal invitations.
  • Don’t make use of a.m. or p.m, in its place, use “in the morning”, “in the afternoon”, or “in the evening”.
  • Incorporate the location of the ceremony, using the detailed address for out-of-town guests.
  • Dress Code:

Wedding invitation etiquette indicates that the dress code if you’re mentioning it on the invitation,  is the lower right-hand corner of the invitation. If you don’t contain a note on the dress, the invitation will point out the dress code. For example, if the invitation is extremely fancy, guests will likely be expecting a formal, black-tie affair, or on the other hand, if the invitation on the simpler side, that indicates an extra casual dress code.

 

  • Separate RSVP Card:

The majority of couples prefer to comprise a separate response card for guests to fill out and send back in the mail. You moreover have the option of having people RSVP via your wedding website. If that’s the case, comprise the website address on a separate card, just as you would with an RSVP card, and point out that guests can let you be familiar with if they can come directly to the location.

Conclusion:

Whether you settle on to hand-make your invites or order them from any professional, the whole lot will center on the mental picture of the day. Include the colors you love and the culture that inspires you surrounded by the design you choose. Formal wedding invitations are usually printed on durable ivory, cream, or white paper using a classic letter style. These are typically engraved and written in the third person style. But you have some jiggle room, casual weddings don’t have as lots of “rules” to go after, but no matter what, choose invitations that speak to your style

FAQs:

Q: What is the proper etiquette for wedding invitation wording?

The invitation has to include the names of the hosts (usually the bride’s parents)at the top of the invite and mention the name of the wedding couple, ceremony date, day of the week, time, and location of the venue. The word “and” among two names normally points out two people are already married, while the names of unmarried persons, such as you and your groom, are stacked. Your invitation wording should match up with the ritual and style of your ceremony. From casual to formal, the wording should replicate the style and tone you’d like to set. Every wedding invitation must comprise these elements: host{s}, the couple getting married, date, time, and location.

Q: How do you write an invitation message?

Writing a wedding invitation message may not be as inventive of a procedure to consider as calligraphy, color schemes, and paper designs but when it comes down to it, even the most elegant wedding invitations require being informative. Your wedding invitations must express the basic information concerning your celebration all while offering a sneak peek of your wedding artistic and style as a couple. They need to spell out all necessary wedding info, who’s hosting, who’s getting married, and when and where the ceremony and reception will occur.